Posts Tagged ‘influence’

For the last few weeks I have been in many conversations around ‘Aid vs Trade’. Fully understanding the negative implications around the providing of Aid in a world of desperateness, the opposite also exist that Aid in combination of discipline, guidance, and empowerment, could serve as a catalyst for change.

Below are two great ‘Ted’ conversations worth discussing. The first challenging the thought about ‘Aid vs Trade’, and the second giving great inside as to the growing economy and future of our beloved continent.

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Compass-web-300x199“Personality can open doors, but only character can keep them open” – Elmer G Letterman

“Things turnout best for people who make the best out of the way things turnout” – author unknown

Motivational slogans have been part of my life for a very long time. They keep me going and just when I think I have reached the end of myself, the following slogan reminds me that things are still ok;

“Eat a live frog, every morning, and nothing worse will happen to you all day”

Isn’t it amazing, we tend to live this dream of which even we are not sure what the next sunrise may bring. Life has this way of exposing glimpses of the future that motivates us to take the next step. For some this might be strange or not true, but I strongly believe that if we keep focusing forward and are attentive to the things happening around us, we might be surprised of what we will discover.
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salt_of_the_earth11One of the more discussed topics currently circulating the mission world is that of the ‘global north vs the global south’. With many referring to the global south now leading the way as to how missions are to be done, the question from those in the global north are what their responsibility heron forward should be.

Calisto Odede of Nairobi, Kenya, refers to the people of the south as the ‘people from the 11th hour’. Reading from Matthew 20, he acknowledge the great momentum people from the north gave in spreading the gospel amongst those in the south. However, although those who came early have been part of the mission movement much longer, their responsibility is not greater than those who arrived on the 11th hour. As those of the south start to take their responsibility within God’s mission movement, they are not to be seen as late comers, but us fellow workers who are to receive the same payment at the end.

Stories of great missionary legends such as David Livingstone are well known in mission circles around the world, which is great. But how many people know the names of ‘Chuma’ and ‘Susi’? The unknown heroes who carried his body for five month to the coast where it was then taken to Britain. We would not have known about the story if it wasn’t for these two men; people from the 11th hour.

The situation in the South is changing, very quickly. The question is not as much how the global north is to adapt, or what the south is about to do, but rather how we are to ensure the gospel is taken from everywhere to everywhere?
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limp-bookEvery now and then I come across a book that forces me to stop, and reflect on my current leadership style; ‘Leading with a Limp’ is one of them. Most of the time people are encouraged to lead from a place of strength. Admitting to one’s weaknesses and struggles are often seen as inappropriate in our western culture, however Allender challenges this worldview. His book ‘Leading with a Limp’ reminds us that “if you are a leader, you’re in the battle of your life,” and therefore leading from your point of weakness might just be the edge you need. Allender summarizes it as follow, “to the degree you face and name and deal with your failures as a leader, to that same extent you will create an environment conducive to growing and retaining productive and committed colleagues”.

Married with three children, Dan B. Allender is the founder of Mars Hill Graduate School, Seattle. Previously served as the president, he is a professor in counseling, a therapist in private practice, and a popular speaker. He is the author of numerous books including ‘To Be Told’, ‘How Children Raise Parents’, ‘The Healing Path’, and ‘The Wounded Heart’.
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When I first heard the term ‘Global Leadership’ my thoughts were about people who have ‘really made’ it in leadership; those who are recognized around the world as a good leader. The people who came to mind were those writing books about leadership, presidents of countries, major businessmen and women who have developed global businesses, and people working for global organisations such as the United Nations (UN).

As time progressed and my interest in leadership grew, I realised that many of these men and women were all normal people; some with influence and some without. Some have the ability to lead well when change was needed, and some were merely in a position due to democratic processes.

Today as we find so many different understandings as to what leadership really is, the added subjective of ‘Global’ adds to the complexity of defining a basic explanation. Northouse, in his book ‘Leadership; Theory and Practice’, states that, amongst other things four primary aspects of leadership exist; leadership is a process, leadership involves influence, leadership occurs in groups, and leadership includes attention to common goals (Northouse, 2010, p3). (more…)